National Contests

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National Contests

The American Regions Mathematics League (ARML) offers a two test Power Contest to be worked on by a team at the students' high school. The Power Contest provides a group problem solving situation similar to the power question found at ARML Competitions.

The mathematics level of the contest problems has been geared so that students in an honors class, in a math club, or on a math team can have a unique problem solving and mathematical writing experience. There is no limit to the size of the team working on each Power Contest problem set, but the time for solving the problem set is limited to 45 minutes. Coaches will receive the contest materials at least one week prior to contest dates and may schedule the contest anytime during the designated week and a half. After completing the contest, student solutions are then mailed back and are graded using a forty point rubric

Trophies are awarded to the top ten scoring teams.

Contest application can be downloaded here.

The dates for the 2016-2017 contest are Oct. 29– Nov. 13, 2015 and Feb. 25 – Mar. 12, 2017 (spring dates are subject to change).

Contact information for questions: email Micah Fogel

View a sample test, here. Answers are available.

Other National Contests

If you can suggest any contests which should be added to this list, let us know.

  • The American Mathematics Competitions (AMC) are the series of tests which determine the students who will be invited to the Math Olympiad Summer Program (MOSP). The MOSP is a training program for the top students in the country, including the United States team that will compete at the International Mathematics Olympiad. Early rounds of the AMC take place at the schools of the participants, whereas top students are invited to the Massachusetts Institue of Technology for the final round, the USA Mathematics Olympiad.

  • Math Prize for Girls offers over $48,000 in cash prizes to the top ten competitors.
  • Purple Comet! Math Meet: an annual, free, online, international, team mathematics competition designed for middle and high school students
  • The American Regions Mathematics League (ARML) is held each year at Penn State University, the University of Iowa, the University of Georgia, and the University of Nevada in Las Vegas on the weekend immediately following Memorial Day. Teams of fifteen students participate in a variety of team-oriented mathematics competitions which emphasize problem solving and mathematical writing.

  • National STEM Video Game Challenge: A free youth video game making competition for students in grades 5-12 to promote skills related to science, technology, engineering, and math.

  • American Mathematical Society's Who Wants to Be a Mathematician National Contest: In this contest, high school students compete for cash and prizes by answering multiple choice mathematics questions. The top prize is $5000 for the student and $5000 for the math department at his or her school. There is no fee to participate.

  • National Assessment & Testing offers five competitions administered and scored at your school, then returned to us by mail for determination of awards. The problems on each contest range from easy to difficult, providing both confidence and challenges to students of all abilities. Each contest's $50.00 registration fee allows unlimited participation by students at your school, and schools registering for all five contests will receive a discount, paying only $200.00.

  • The USA Mathematical Talent Search helps students develop problem-solving and proof-writing skills through a series of tests which students work on at their own pace in their own homes. Any high school student may participate for free. The USAMTS is an excellent opportunity to hone your mathematical writing skills.

  • The Mandelbrot Competition is a mail-in competition for individuals and teams. The contest emphasizes problem solving skills, teamwork, and mathematical writing. Along with the USAMTS, it is one of the few non-invitational contests that offers the opportunity for students to write proofs.

  • MATHCOUNTS is the premier middle school extracurricular mathematics program in the country. In addition to producing educational problem solving materials, MATHCOUNTS holds local, state, and national competitions and offers large scholarships to top students.

  • The Math League produces materials and mail-in contests for students in grades 4-12. The students in the contests are typically grouped by geographic region and the tests are appropriate for beginning problem solvers.

  • The Continental Math League offers math leagues in grades 2-9, a calculus league for high school, and a computer science league.

  • The Wisconsin Mathematics, Engineering, and Science Talent Search offers problem sets of five challenging problems designed to encourage exploration outside the classroom and inspire students to develop problem-solving and mathematical writing skills. The Wisconsin Talent Search is an excellent resource for students preparing for the USAMO.

  • The AMATYC Student Math League is a national math league for students in two-year colleges.

  • Association for Women in Mathematics Essay Contest
  • The International Sustainable World (Energy, Engineering, and Environment) Project Olympiad, is a groundbreaking science fair open to secondary school student. Young scientists from all over the world meet at I-SWEEEP fair to display their research projects related to globe’s sustainability issues.

  • The High School Mathematical Contest in Modeling (HiMCM) is a two-day mail-in team contest in which students work in teams to apply mathematics to real-world modeling problems. Teams are given thirty-six hours to create and present solutions to problems designed by The Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications (COMAP).

  • Zoom International Math League: On-line Challenge
  • The Ole Miss Problems of the Week

  • Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision: This is a competition for students from all grade levels. The students must pick a technology and project what it will be like in the future and what discoveries will need to be made in order for the changes to be realized. Groups of two, three or four will describe their research in both a written description and five simulated web page graphics.
  • American Scholastic Association hosts an annual math contest.